African American men were granted the right to vote BUT Jim Crow laws prevented them from exercising this right until much later.

The women's suffrage movement fought long and hard for their voting rights and earned them. It still did'n't help African American women though.

Through the Indian Citizenship Act, Native Americans of all tribes were granted their right to vote.

IF YOU HAVE COMPLETED YOUR ENTIRE SENTENCE

YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO VOTE!

Wisconsin removes a person's right to vote
if they are serving any portion of a sentence
for a felony conviction.
For details see WI Statute 6.03(1)(b).*

*This time period includes both prison, jail, and while on community supervision.

HOW DO I VOTE AFTER
MY SENTENCE IS COMPLETE?

WHAT CAN I DO TO UNLOCK THE VOTE?

Get registered to vote at my vote.wi.us




Research the candidates to see who aligns with your values



Sign on as a coalition partner




Volunteer to canvass or phone bank



Go to my vote.wi.us (again) to find out your polling place and who will be on your ballot

On voting day, GO VOTE!
*You can also participate in early voting or get an absentee ballot if you are unable to make it to the polls.]

Invite EXPO Leaders to. give an Unlock the Vote presentation at your organization or place of worship

Call Senators and Assembly people to ask their support of Unlock the Vote!

It's time to Unlock the Vote!


Voting helps people feel connected to their communities, and reduces recidivism.
Punishment needs to fit the offense. Lengthy disenfranchisement is simply out of proportion for all but the most serious crimes.
In 2016, the average length of stay for parole in Wisconsin was estimated at 38 months or over 3 years. This is 1.7 times greater than the average across all states (22 months), ranking Wisconsin third nationally in. terms of expected length of time people spend under parole supervision

One out of every 9 African Americans are disenfranchised in comparison to 1 out of every 50 Wisconsin voters.
Courts and Department of Corrections make very clear a person who has been sentenced for a felony conviction loses their right to vote

BUT

The same is not done when a sentence is completed in full and rights are restored!
"No taxation without representation"
was a major tenant of freedom when the Unite States was founded. Yet, each year nearly 40,000 people who are on felony community supervision are being stripped of their right to vote. We the people, who were not property-owning white men, have had to fight to gain the right to vote.

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